County Council Recognizes East Lansdowne Mayor Who Published Book in Memory of His Son

July 16, 2018

Source: County Council Recognizes East Lansdowne Mayor Who Published Book in Memory of His Son

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Middletown Township Considers Moving Granite Run Debris to Forthcoming Park

July 16, 2018

Source: Middletown Township Considers Moving Granite Run Debris to Forthcoming Park

Legendary Boxer Bernard Hopkins Shares His Inspirational Story with Glen Mills Students

July 16, 2018

Source: Legendary Boxer Bernard Hopkins Shares His Inspirational Story with Glen Mills Students

Another Year Brings Another Tax Increase in Most School Districts in Delaware County

July 16, 2018

Source: Another Year Brings Another Tax Increase in Most School Districts in Delaware County

High rents, home prices hurting younger Americans’ homeownership rates · Pennsylvania Association of Realtors

July 16, 2018

Source: High rents, home prices hurting younger Americans’ homeownership rates · Pennsylvania Association of Realtors

What happens if real estate is forced to pay minimum wage?

July 15, 2018

Source: What happens if real estate is forced to pay minimum wage?

Suburban REALTORS® Alliance News Brief Headlines-July 16, 2018

July 13, 2018
Suburban REALTORS® Alliance
News Brief Headlines

Scroll down for full text of articles

General

  • Wall Street is bullish on rentals
  • URGENT! Tell Congress not to let the National Flood Insurance Program lapse   

 

Bucks
  • Report finds ‘irregularities’ in Lower Southampton building and zoning operations
  • DEP considers 1986 fire as potential cause of Rockhill water contamination
  • Bensalem continues public hearing on St. Katharine Drexel rezoning
  • Levittown SEPTA station on-budget but behind schedule

 

Chester
  • West Nantmeal updates U&O ordinance to comply with MCOCA
  • Mariner East 2 pipeline may take alternate route
  • Oxford Mainstreet earns national recognition
  • Campaign to house 100 homeless vets a success
  • ‘Citizen’s risk assessment’ of pipeline project moves forward

 

Delaware
  • Springfield School District OKs 2.4 percent tax hike
  • Boom time for new code officer in Clifton Heights
  • William Penn-led funding lawsuit isn’t ‘moot,’ argue lawyers
  • Clifton Heights to consider changes to rental ordinance
  • Mariner East 2 pipeline may take alternate route
  • ‘Citizen’s risk assessment’ of pipeline project moves forward

 

Montgomery
  • Lower Merion planners recommend approval for conversion of old landscaping site
  • Teva moving American headquarters out of Montgomery County
  • Limerick keeps housing rehab program for one more year
  • Turnpike interchange still planned for Norristown

 

Philadelphia
  • Philly OKs building code to modernize construction, address climate change
  • Efforts to tear down `imminently dangerous’ buildings get a $2M budget lift

 

General

Wall Street is bullish on rentals
Investors are predicting that Americans will increasingly choose to be renters, and they’re buying up even more single-family homes, especially in areas with fast-growing economies, to stay ahead of the trend. A rising number of apartments in recent years has increased vacancies and driven down rental yields, prompting investors to turn back to single-family homes for rentals. The number of homes purchased by major investors in 2017 was about 29,000, up 60 percent from the previous year, according to Amherst Capital Management LLC, a real estate investment firm. Investment firm Pretium Partners LLC recently announced that it had raised more than $1 billion to add 26,000 rental homes to its portfolio. In markets with low inventory, investors are building new homes. They are also targeting wealthier tenants, who tend to have children and need more bedrooms than apartments can offer, and who may be more willing to weather rent increases in order to remain in a good school district.
Source: Realtor Magazine; 7/11/2018

URGENT! Tell Congress not to let the National Flood Insurance Program lapse
The National Association of Realtors® (NAR) has launched a Call-for-Action so you can tell Congress not to let the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) lapse. Every time NFIP expires, the real estate industry sees a loss of 40,000 property sales per month. Without the reauthorization of the NFIP, which is set to expire on July 31, the program cannot issue or renew flood insurance policies in the 22,000 communities where flood insurance is required for a mortgage. The program is incredibly important to Pennsylvania. Our state is 12th in the U.S. in the number of NFIP policies issued and fifth in the nation in the number of flood claims filed. Flood claims have been filed in 66 of the commonwealth’s 67 counties. NAR has been advocating for Congress to reauthorize the program for the next five years. The association would like to see the bill’s private market reforms retained and expanded, enabling consumers to meet federal requirements with private flood insurance offers as an alternative to NFIP policies. NAR believes building on the risk mitigation provisions would help keep rates affordable. The association also recommends that the NFIP should use modern mapping technology to produce building-specific risk assessments. Respond to the Call-for-Action and tell Congress how important the National Flood Insurance Program is to Pennsylvania homeowners and buyers.
Source: PARJustListed; 6/20/2018

Bucks

Report finds ‘irregularities’ in Lower Southampton building and zoning operations
Earlier this year, Lower Southampton supervisors authorized Keystone Municipal Services to complete a two-year review of zoning and land development permit applications. The purpose of the review was to examine the processes and procedures of the department, verify compliance with state codes and identify improvements that could be made. Keystone found irregularities in the township’s building and zoning department operations, including several development projects issued permits without completing the required approval process, according to a copy of the report obtained by the Bucks County Courier Times. The main recommendation in the report is that the township should hire “experienced” support for the current zoning officer to provide detailed reviews of subdivision and land development applications and zoning permits, “while understanding and enforcing the Pennsylvania Municipal Planning Code requirements.” Lower Southampton supervisors are scheduled to review the report on July 11, after it has undergone a legal review, according to Township Manager John McMenamin. It is unknown what the findings mean for property owners of the completed and underway projects mentioned in the report.
Source: Bucks County Courier Times; 7/6/2018

DEP considers 1986 fire as potential cause of Rockhill water contamination
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is investigating whether foams used to combat a large fire at Bergey’s Tires in West Rockhill could be a potential source of water contamination in the area. A 25-foot-high pile of used tires caught on fire, which required more than 30 fire companies and 20 hours to control. Joining in the fight were teams of firefighters from the former Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove and Naval Air Warfare Center Warminster, who tried to subdue the fire with firefighting foams. The foams are now known to have contained the chemicals PFOS and PFOA which have been found in dozens of drinking water wells in the area. The wells were closed in 2016. The DEP published a proposed action plan last month to deal with the contamination and is taking public comment on the proposal through Aug. 31, which can be emailed to lharper@pa.gov. The Bucks County Courier Times and The Intelligencer have been reporting on this issue and, as a public resource, have made all of the reporting about the water contamination issue available to subscribers and nonsubscribers on their websites — http://www.buckscountycouriertimes.com/news/horsham-pfos and http://www.theintell.com/news/horsham-pfos. Maps of the contaminated areas have been added to those sites, along with recent news articles and efforts by area congressmen to fund testing and cleanup. Realtors® are encouraged to reach out to specific municipalities for more information regarding water safety in areas where they do business.
Source: Bucks County Courier Times; 7/8/2018

Bensalem continues public hearing on St. Katharine Drexel rezoning
Bensalem Township Council unanimously approved a motion to continue a public hearing on whether to rezone two parcels of the 44-acre former National Shrine of St. Katharine Drexel from institutional to residential. Township solicitor Joseph Pizzo said putting the rezoning ordinance on meeting agendas for the council to table until the Aug. 27 meeting “gives the township some protection and control over the future use of the property,” in that other interested parties would not “race to the courthouse” to submit different proposals to the township before a vote. The potential buyer of the property, Havertown-based Aquinas Realty Trust, is expected to submit a development proposal to the township within the next 30 days. Pizzo said that even if the sale to Aquinas falls through, Bensalem could still move ahead with rezoning the land to residential for consistency with surrounding areas of the township.
Source: Bucks County Courier Times; 7/10/2018

Levittown SEPTA station on-budget but behind schedule
The construction of a new Levittown SEPTA station and parking lot began in 2015. The $22 million project remains on-budget, despite some “underground obstructions,” but is now a few months behind schedule for completion due to the obstructions and “unanticipated work along the Northeast Corridor that required [Amtrak] support personnel to be intermittently re-assigned from the project,” said Kate O’Connor, SEPTA’s chief engineer. The station was originally scheduled for completion this fall but will now not be finished until winter 2019. When completed, the Levittown station will be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and will have increased parking.
Source: Bucks County Courier Times; 6/21/2018

Chester

West Nantmeal updates U&O ordinance to comply with MCOCA
West Nantmeal Township has adopted an ordinance that incorporates the state Municipal Code and Ordinance Compliance Act (MCOCA) into its regulations for use and occupancy inspections. In summary, the ordinance establishes property maintenance standards and regulations that apply to all residential and nonresidential structures and buildings in the township. It includes definitions, authorizes the township code official to administer and enforce the ordinance and conduct necessary inspections to determine compliance. The updated ordinance also establishes standards for exterior property and premises, establishes a procedure for issuance of a use and occupancy certificate upon transfer or sale of property or a change in tenants for commercial properties, lists what items will be inspected prior to issuance of use and occupancy certificate, and identifies a procedure for issuance of temporary use and occupancy certificates and issuance of temporary access certificates consistent with MCOCA. Alliance staff reviewed the ordinance and will update the municipal databaseaccordingly.
Source: Daily Local; 6/29/2018

Mariner East 2 pipeline may take alternate route
After falling more than 18 months behind schedule, Sunoco has decided to use a portion of an existing 12-inch pipeline to connect and bypass yet-to-be-completed portions of the 350-mile Mariner East 2 (ME2) pipeline. Sunoco plans to use a portion of the 12-inch line only in Chester and Delaware counties, from Wallace Township in Chester County to Middletown Township in Delaware County. Sunoco spokesperson Lisa Dillinger said that plans to complete the ME2 pipeline remain in place, as the company responds to customer demand. The 12-inch pipeline underwent a $30 million upgrade in 2016. It carried petroleum from east to west, but the shipping direction will be reversed to carry ethane, butane and propane, by-products of fracking, from Marcellus shale deposits in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio to Marcus Hook. Most of the 12-inch pipeline weaves through the same right-of-way as the ME2 pipeline.
Source: Daily Local; 7/6/2018

Oxford Mainstreet earns national recognition
Oxford Mainstreet Inc. (OMI) has been designated as an affiliate Main Street America™ program by the National Main Street Center. The designation, given to 299 affiliates this year, recognizes communities’ commitment to achieving meaningful improvements in downtowns and commercial districts. “Main Streets are the heart of our communities, and these Main Street America programs truly strengthen the economic, social and cultural fabric of their entire communities,” said Patrice Frey, president and CEO of the National Main Street Center. Organized in 1999 by a group of area business leaders, merchants, local officials and volunteers, the mission of Oxford Mainstreet Inc. is to collaborate with organizations to promote and foster economic growth and stability within the Business Improvement District (BID) and surrounding areas, while preserving Downtown Oxford’s rich historic and cultural identity. OMI is an independent nonprofit organization committed to improving the quality of life for residents and visitors by making downtown Oxford a more attractive and enjoyable place to live, work, play and shop.
Source: Avon Grove Sun; 7/3/2018

Campaign to house 100 homeless vets a success
A coalition of volunteers from veterans and housing organizations came together with a goal of housing 100 homeless veterans in 100 days, and ended up housing 103 veterans. The Master List Committee, which identified veterans in need of housing, included members from the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Coatesville, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Housing Authority of Chester County, Supportive Services for Veteran Families, Veterans Multi-Service Center, Chester County Department of Community Development, the Fresh Start Foundation and Catholic Social Services. The Master List Committee tracks the status and progress toward permanent housing of each veteran, and facilitates coordination of housing services between community providers. This was the fifth 100-day campaign in recent years, part of a larger effort to end veteran homelessness in Chester County. The team behind the campaign expressed thanks to the many landlords who provided affordable housing options, which can be difficult for low-income veterans to find in Chester County.
Source: Daily Local; 7/5/2018  

‘Citizen’s risk assessment’ of pipeline project moves forward
A group of community leaders in Chester and Delaware counties is moving forward with an independent risk assessment of the Mariner East pipeline project, which weaves through high-density areas in the two counties. The development of a “citizen’s risk assessment” came about through a series of community meetings organized by state Sen. Andy Dinniman earlier this year. Community organizations such as DelChesco United for Pipeline Safety, East Goshen Safety and Environmental Advocates, Middletown Coalition for Community Safety, and West Whiteland Residents for Pipeline Safety, have engaged the services of a qualified vendor to perform a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA). The QRA will examine potential consequences in order to assess the risks to public safety associated with Sunoco’s proposed Mariner East pipeline project, which would transport propane, butane and ethane to the Marcus Hook Industrial Complex. The QRA will be specifically designed to evaluate the public safety risks associated with a release of hazardous, highly volatile liquids, which present hazards that are qualitatively different from “ordinary” hazardous liquids such as gasoline. The results of this analysis will be publicly shared and applicable to areas along the proposed Mariner East route. A number of municipalities, led by East Goshen Township, will make, or are considering making, a contribution to the risk assessment fund. The Clean Air Council, a nonprofit established in 1967, is operating as fiscal agent for funding and the contract.
Source: Daily Local; 7/7/2018

Delaware

Springfield School District OKs 2.4 percent tax hike
The Springfield School Board unanimously approved a final budget of $84.7 million for the 2018-2019 school year — including a 2.4 percent increase in taxes — with almost no changes from the proposed document passed in May. The only alteration, according to the district’s executive director, Don Mooney, was approximately $50,000 in additional revenue resulting from Gov. Tom Wolf’s budget approved in late June. The tax increase is set at the 2.4 percent Act 1 index. The millage rate of 32.9796 mills will add $113 in taxes for an average home assessed at about $147,000, for a total bill of $4,842. The projected Homestead Exclusion for eligible homeowners will remain almost steady as a $186 tax credit. The small state revenue hike illustrates the challenges of mandated spending. While the commonwealth added millions of dollars to the total budget, the funding formula for how dollars are allotted to each district resulted in only modest increases for Springfield. Those added dollars will be used for basic education and special education. However, the total subsidies from the commonwealth have not kept pace with costs.
Source: Daily Times; 7/6/2018

Boom time for new code officer in Clifton Heights
Clifton Heights Borough’s new code enforcement officer is so busy that council authorized hiring a part-time officer to assist in the detail. John Gould, hired in May, recommended an addition to his staff due to the quantity of inspections and complaint calls. Gould provided borough council with his accomplishments for the month of May at a recent meeting, including conducting 58 inspections of resale properties, construction sites and rental properties. He issued 168 notices of violations, and 127 tickets or citations for violations, and followed up on 50 complaints. “The property maintenance abatement crew has caught up with the high grass at our problem and vacant properties,” Gould said. “The properties have been placed on a maintenance schedule.” The codes department is also targeting property maintenance conditions at blighted properties in the borough.
Source: Daily Times; 7/9/2018

William Penn-led funding lawsuit isn’t ‘moot,’ argue lawyers
The Philadelphia-based law firms representing more than a dozen petitioners in an education funding lawsuit against the state have filed their response with the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, explaining why the case is not legally moot. They cite a $155 million drop in funds for classroom expenses since 2013 and the expanding gap of spending between wealthy and poorer school districts. The Public Interest Law Center and the Education Law Center — with assistance from the firm O’Melveny & Myers LLP — filed a 112-page response to the court in the case of William Penn School District et. al. v. Pennsylvania Department of Education et. al., to rebut a preliminary objection brought by co-defendant state Senate President Pro-Tempore Joe Scarnati (R-25), of Jefferson County. At the core of the petitioners’ argument is Act 35 of 2016, which established the use of a need-based “fair funding” formula. In use since the 2015-2016 budget, only new funds added to the basic education budget line item — $538 million dollars out of $6 billion for 2018-2019, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Education — are applied to the formula and distributed accordingly to the state’s 500 districts. Scarnati has said the fair funding formula that has been enacted since the suit was filed in 2014 has fixed the state’s funding problem, declaring the case moot. Petitioners counter that from 2014 to 2017, the unreimbursed district contributions to the state pension program have increased $867.6 million dollars, while basic education, special education and Ready to Learn Block grants in that same timeframe have increased $712 million, an overall loss of $155 million for classroom expenses. Petitioners William Penn and Wilkes Barre school districts have lost up to 10 percent of their teaching staffs in the past few years, Shenandoah Valley School District cannot provide busing to all of its students, and a middle school in Greater Johnstown had to close because it could not afford repairs, all due to lack of appropriate funding.
Source: Daily Times; 7/9/2018

Clifton Heights to consider changes to rental ordinance
Clifton Heights Borough will consider adopting changes to its requirements for rental properties. As described in a public notice, Ordinance 826 would “protect and promote the public health, safety and welfare of its citizens, to establish rights and obligations of owners and occupants relating to residential and commercial rental units in the borough, to encourage owners and occupants to maintain and improve the quality of rental units within the community, and as a means to these ends, this ordinance provides for a regular inspection program and scope, registration and licensing of residential and commercial rental units, and penalties for noncompliance; and other remedies and the effective date.” The ordinance will be considered for adoption on Tuesday, July 17, at 7:30 p.m. at Borough Hall, 30 S. Springfield Road, Clifton Heights. Clifton Heights has a rental inspection requirement in place. The Alliance staff has requested a copy of Ordinance 826 for review.
Source: Daily Times; 7/6/2018

Mariner East 2 pipeline may take alternate route
After falling more than 18 months behind schedule, Sunoco has decided to use a portion of an existing 12-inch pipeline to connect and bypass yet-to-be-completed portions of the 350-mile Mariner East 2 (ME2) pipeline. Sunoco plans to use a portion of the 12-inch line only in Chester and Delaware counties, from Wallace Township in Chester County to Middletown Township in Delaware County. Sunoco spokesperson Lisa Dillinger said that plans to complete the ME2 pipeline remain in place, as the company responds to customer demand. The 12-inch pipeline underwent a $30 million upgrade in 2016. It carried petroleum from east to west, but the shipping direction will be reversed to carry ethane, butane and propane, by-products of fracking, from Marcellus shale deposits in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio to Marcus Hook. Most of the 12-inch pipeline weaves through the same right-of-way as the ME2 pipeline.
Source: Daily Local; 7/6/2018

‘Citizen’s risk assessment’ of pipeline project moves forward
A group of community leaders in Chester and Delaware counties is moving forward with an independent risk assessment of the Mariner East pipeline project, which weaves through high-density areas in the two counties. The development of a “citizen’s risk assessment” came about through a series of community meetings organized by state Sen. Andy Dinniman earlier this year. Community organizations such as DelChesco United for Pipeline Safety, East Goshen Safety and Environmental Advocates, Middletown Coalition for Community Safety, and West Whiteland Residents for Pipeline Safety, have engaged the services of a qualified vendor to perform a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA). The QRA will examine potential consequences in order to assess the risks to public safety associated with Sunoco’s proposed Mariner East pipeline project, which would transport propane, butane and ethane to the Marcus Hook Industrial Complex. The QRA will be specifically designed to evaluate the public safety risks associated with a release of hazardous, highly volatile liquids, which present hazards that are qualitatively different from “ordinary” hazardous liquids such as gasoline. The results of this analysis will be publicly shared and applicable to areas along the proposed Mariner East route. A number of municipalities, led by East Goshen Township, will make, or are considering making, a contribution to the risk assessment fund. The Clean Air Council, a nonprofit established in 1967, is operating as fiscal agent for funding and the contract.
Source: Daily Local; 7/7/2018

Montgomery

Lower Merion planners recommend approval for conversion of old landscaping site
A proposal to transform the site of a former landscaping business in the middle of a residential Haverford neighborhood has won a recommendation for approval from the Lower Merion Planning Commission. The commission endorsed a plan by developer Michael Main to reconfigure and subdivide several properties and a row of 11 garages along the 500 block of Old Lancaster Road. Two new single-family, semi-detached homes would be built on lots 2 and 3 with two-car garages, and the homes at 501 and 507 Old Lancaster Road would be added as class 2 historic resources. The project could go before the Lower Merion Board of Commissioners later this month for approval.
Source: Main Line Times; 7/10/2018

Teva moving American headquarters out of Montgomery County
Global pharmaceutical giant Teva has announced it is moving its American headquarters out of Montgomery County to Parsippany, New Jersey. The current Parsippany location will be expanded to oversee all commercial operations within the United States. There will be about a thousand positions at the headquarters, including 800 transferred from the North Wales location. According to the Philadelphia Business Journal, the annual median wage for individuals leaving is about $128,000. Teva said they are moving the headquarters to be in a more “centralized” location that is closer to other scientific headquarters. Other pharmaceutical companies located in Parsippany include Ferring, Edenbridge, Castle Creek and Novartis. Teva still has Pennsylvania operations in Horsham, West Chester, Frazer and New Britain.
Source: Limerick Patch.com; 7/6/2018

Limerick keeps housing rehab program for one more year
Limerick Township supervisors have decided to continue a federally funded housing rehabilitation program for at least one more year by accepting $200,000 in Community Development Block Grant funding. The program has been helping township residents with home repairs for over 20 years, but escalating administrative costs have become a burden. The rules for the projects — prevailing wage, ensuring women- and minority-owned businesses are among the bidders, and requirements that contractors hire low-income workers for the projects — however well-intentioned, have strained township finances. According to Township Manager Dan Kerr, if the township declines the money, the program funded by the federal block grants will end. Although township staff recommended withdrawing from the program and participating in a similar program operated by Montgomery County, the supervisors decided to give it one more year.
Source: Pottstown Mercury; 7/6/2018

Turnpike interchange still planned for Norristown
The first two phases of the Lafayette Street Project in Norristown have been completed, and the third is under construction. Once completed, the path will be cleared for construction of a new turnpike interchange at Ridge Pike near the new Wawa. The first phase extended Lafayette Street beyond Ford Street to Conshohocken Road and Diamond Avenue. The second phase improved local roads, and the third phase will reconstruct and widen existing Lafayette Street, as well as relocate the Schuylkill River Trail. Once phase three is completed, the project will move into Phase 4, which is the construction of the turnpike interchange. Matthew Edmond, section chief of the Montgomery County Planning Commission, said the interchange will be built after the turnpike introduces cashless tolling across the entire system by early-to-mid 2020s.
Source: morethanthecurve.com; 6/25/2018 

Philadelphia

Philly OKs building code to modernize construction, address climate change
The City of Philadelphia has officially adopted a new building code in an effort to modernize construction and address more severe weather associated with climate change. The city is one of the first on the East Coast to implement the 2018 International Building Code, said Michael Fink who oversees code enforcement in the city. Department of Licenses and Inspections Commissioner Dave Perri said it will also bring the city into modern times, especially when it comes to high-tech and efficient building practices. Increasingly over the years, changes to the building code have been the driver to advance other critical societal goals — such as accessible features to insure use by people of all physical abilities, energy-efficiency improvements, and resistance to floods and climate change,” he said. The new code will take effect on Oct. 1.
Source: Philadelphia Inquirer; 6/28/2018

Efforts to tear down `imminently dangerous’ buildings get a $2M budget lift
In the recently approved city budget, Mayor Jim Kenney secured $2 million to accelerate demolition of vacant buildings the Department of Licenses and Inspections (L&I) considers dangerous. Philadelphia suffers persistent problems with abandoned and dilapidated structures, the legacy of population loss, poverty and racial discrimination. Licenses and Inspections is tasked with monitoring the state of the building stock and demolishing those structures that have been deemed a threat to safety. The department needs the $2 million boost to work through a backlog of buildings considered “imminently dangerous,” according to Commissioner Dave Perri. Currently, Perri said, there are 4,555 buildings in Philadelphia considered “unsafe,” a designation that does not necessitate demolition and still leaves open the option of repair and reinvestment. One hundred ninety-two buildings are designated “imminently dangerous” — the agency wants to demolish them as soon as possible. Every year, 2,000 buildings are added to the unsafe and “imminently dangerous” lists. Those additions are based upon on-the-ground inspection reports and an annual aerial survey in which L&I searches the city for buildings that have holes in their roofs or are covered by telltale blue tarps. Half of those are dealt with by demolition through L&I, which almost exclusively targets abandoned buildings, or through private parties such as developers. The other half are repaired at the owners’ expense under pressure from L&I. Right now, roughly as many buildings are added to the list each year as are removed. With the new funding, Perri said, his department can tackle 117 additional demolitions a year, on top of the 500 to 550 it already handles, with the hope of ensuring that by 2020 there will be no backlog of imminently dangerous buildings.
Source: PlanPhilly; 7/5/2018

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a member of the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce,

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Lieutenant in County’s Criminal Investigation Division Retires After 44 Years of Service

July 13, 2018

Source: Lieutenant in County’s Criminal Investigation Division Retires After 44 Years of Service

Following $4 Million Restoration, Aronimink Golf Club Ready to Offer New Challenges

July 13, 2018

Source: Following $4 Million Restoration, Aronimink Golf Club Ready to Offer New Challenges

Upper Darby’s Llanerch Diner Again the Scene of Film Crews

July 13, 2018

Source: Upper Darby’s Llanerch Diner Again the Scene of Film Crews